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  • Ramnarayan Rawat, Associate Professor in the History Department at the University of Delaware

    Associate Professor
    University of Delaware
    209 John Munroe Hall
    Newark, DE 19716
    302-831-2375
    on leave

    Biography

    I am a historian of South Asia with particular interests in colonial and postcolonial India, racism and social exclusion, subaltern histories, and histories of democracy. My research focuses on Dalits (‘untouchables’) of India and their engagement with colonialism, nationalism, spatial and social exclusionary regimes, and democratic thought and practice in modern India. I have recently finished a co-edited book, Dalit Studies, with my colleague K. Satyanarayana based in Hyderabad (India),  Duke University Press, 2016. I am currently writing a second book, ‘The Dalit Public Sphere: A Subaltern history Liberalism and Democratic Practices’ which explores the role of Dalit groups in introducing innovative ideas and practices in the history of liberal thought. The second book project has received generous support from the Smuts Visiting Fellowship, University of Cambridge, the American Council of Learned Societies’ Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowship, and the Senior Fellowship from the American Institute of Indian Studies.

    My first book, Reconsidering Untouchability: Chamars and Dalit History in North India (Ranikhet: Permanent Black, 2012 & Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2011), is the recipient of Joseph Elder book prize awarded by American Institute of Indian Studies (2009) and received ‘Honorable Mention’ in 2013 Association of Asian Studies Bernard S. Cohn book prize. Building on extensive archival and ethnographic fieldwork, Reconsidering Untouchability questioned the association of untouchability with impure occupations by effectively demonstrating that Dalits were historically cultivators who were primarily engaged in agricultural production in north India. It examined the social and cultural politics and Hindi-language writings of Dalit activists and organizations from the early part of the twentieth century to demonstrate that their struggles over identity marked the beginning of a new politics.

    Education

    I received my B.A from the University of Delhi, where I also completed M.A. and M.Phil (1996). I received my doctorate under a joint doctoral program from the University of Delhi and the International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam (2006). My doctoral research was supported by a Harry Frank Guggenheim dissertation fellowship (2003), and the four-year SEPHIS fellowship (1999-2002) awarded by The Netherlands.

    Publications

    Books:

    • South Asian edition of Reconsidering Untouchability: Chamars and Dalits in North India (Ranikhet (India): Permanent Black, 2012)
    • Reconsidering Untouchability: Chamars and Dalit History in North India (Ranikhet: Permanent Black, 2012 & Bloomington; Indiana University Press, 2011)

    Edited Volumes

    • Ramnarayan S Rawat and K. Satyanarayana, editors, Dalit Studies (Durham: Duke University Press, Spring 2016)

    Articles and Book Chapters

    • Ramnarayan Rawat and K. Satyanarayana, “Introduction,” in Rawat and Satyanarayana, (ed.), Dalit Studies. Duke University Press, Spring 2016.
    • Ramnarayan Rawat, “Colonial Archive versus Colonial Sociology: Writing North Indian Dalit History,” in Rawat and Satyanarayana, (ed.), Dalit Studies. Duke University Press, Spring 2016.
    • “Struggle for Identities: Chamar Histories and Politics,” in Sumit Sarkar & Tanika Sarkar (ed.), Caste Reader(Ranikhet: Permanent Black, 2013)
    • “The Making of a Dalit Perspective: The 1940s and the Chamars of Uttar Pradesh”, in Manu Bhagavan and Anne Feldhaus (eds.), Claiming Power from Below: Dalits and the Subaltern Question in India (Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2008)
    • “Partition Politics and Achhut Identity: A Study of Scheduled Castes Federation and Dalit politics in U.P. 1946-1948,” in Suvir Kaul, ed., The Partitions of Memory (Delhi: Permanent Black, 2001 and Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2002)
    • “Genealogies of Dalit Political: Transformation of Achhut from ‘Untouched’ to ‘Untouchable’ in early-twentieth century North India,” Indian Economic and Social History Review, vol. 15, 3, 2015
    • December, 2013, “Occupation, Dignity, and Space: The Rise of Dalit Studies,” review essay on Dalit Studies for online peer reviewed journal History Compass
    • “Making Claims for Power: A New Agenda in Dalit Politics of Uttar Pradesh, 1946-48,” Modern Asian Studies, Vol. 37, No. 3, 2003

 

 

209 John Munroe HallNewark, DE 19716<div class="ExternalClassE4DB142F70424324A0CDEC2BA21B92DD"><p>I am a historian of South Asia with particular interests in colonial and postcolonial India, racism and social exclusion, subaltern histories, and histories of democracy. My research focuses on Dalits (‘untouchables’) of India and their engagement with colonialism, nationalism, spatial and social exclusionary regimes, and democratic thought and practice in modern India. I have recently finished a co-edited book, <em>Dalit Studies</em>, with my colleague K. Satyanarayana based in Hyderabad (India),  Duke University Press, 2016. I am currently writing a second book, ‘The Dalit Public Sphere: A Subaltern history Liberalism and Democratic Practices’ which explores the role of Dalit groups in introducing innovative ideas and practices in the history of liberal thought. The second book project has received generous support from the Smuts Visiting Fellowship, University of Cambridge, the American Council of Learned Societies’ Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowship, and the Senior Fellowship from the American Institute of Indian Studies. </p><p>My first book, <em>Reconsidering Untouchability: Chamars and Dalit History in North India</em> (Ranikhet: Permanent Black, 2012 & Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2011), is the recipient of Joseph Elder book prize awarded by American Institute of Indian Studies (2009) and received ‘Honorable Mention’ in 2013 Association of Asian Studies Bernard S. Cohn book prize. Building on extensive archival and ethnographic fieldwork, <em>Reconsidering Untouchability</em> questioned the association of untouchability with impure occupations by effectively demonstrating that Dalits were historically cultivators who were primarily engaged in agricultural production in north India. It examined the social and cultural politics and Hindi-language writings of Dalit activists and organizations from the early part of the twentieth century to demonstrate that their struggles over identity marked the beginning of a new politics.</p></div><div class="ExternalClass88BCDCD90DF14AD4B7B993A75AFDD104"><p>I received my B.A from the University of Delhi, where I also completed M.A. and M.Phil (1996). I received my doctorate under a joint doctoral program from the University of Delhi and the International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam (2006). My doctoral research was supported by a Harry Frank Guggenheim dissertation fellowship (2003), and the four-year SEPHIS fellowship (1999-2002) awarded by The Netherlands.</p></div><div class="ExternalClass8DEE2907C09B4BC0945935BFEABDBDC5"><h4>Books:</h4><ul><li>South Asian edition of <em>Reconsidering Untouchability: Chamars and Dalits in North India </em>(Ranikhet (India): Permanent Black, 2012)</li><li><em>Reconsidering Untouchability: Chamars and Dalit History in North India</em> (Ranikhet: Permanent Black, 2012 & Bloomington; Indiana University Press, 2011)</li></ul><h4>Edited Volumes</h4><ul><li>Ramnarayan S Rawat and K. Satyanarayana, editors, <em>Dalit Studies </em>(Durham: Duke University Press, Spring 2016)</li></ul><h4>Articles and Book Chapters</h4><ul><li>Ramnarayan Rawat and K. Satyanarayana, “Introduction,” in Rawat and Satyanarayana, (ed.), <em>Dalit Studies</em>. Duke University Press, Spring 2016.</li><li>Ramnarayan Rawat, “Colonial Archive versus Colonial Sociology: Writing North Indian Dalit History,” in Rawat and Satyanarayana, (ed.), <em>Dalit Studies</em>. Duke University Press, Spring 2016.</li><li>“Struggle for Identities: Chamar Histories and Politics,” in Sumit Sarkar & Tanika Sarkar (ed.), <em>Caste Reader</em>(Ranikhet: Permanent Black, 2013)</li><li>“The Making of a Dalit Perspective: The 1940s and the Chamars of Uttar Pradesh”, in Manu Bhagavan and Anne Feldhaus (eds.), <em>Claiming Power from Below: Dalits and the Subaltern Question in India</em> (Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2008)</li><li>“Partition Politics and <em>Achhut</em> Identity: A Study of Scheduled Castes Federation and Dalit politics in U.P. 1946-1948,” in Suvir Kaul, ed., <em>The Partitions of Memory</em> (Delhi: Permanent Black, 2001 and Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2002)</li><li>“Genealogies of Dalit Political: Transformation of Achhut from ‘Untouched’ to ‘Untouchable’ in early-twentieth century North India,” <em>Indian Economic and Social History Review</em>, vol. 15, 3, 2015</li><li>December, 2013, “Occupation, Dignity, and Space: The Rise of Dalit Studies,” review essay on Dalit Studies for online peer reviewed journal <em>History Compass</em></li><li>“Making Claims for Power: A New Agenda in Dalit Politics of Uttar Pradesh, 1946-48,” <em>Modern Asian Studies</em>, Vol. 37, No. 3, 2003</li></ul></div>EducationPublicationsrawat@udel.eduhttps://www.history.udel.edu/Documents%20Bios%20CVs/faculty/rawat-ram-cv.pdfRawat, Ramnarayan302-831-2375<img alt="Professor Ram Rawat" src="/Images%20Bios/faculty/Rawat_Ramnarayan.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />Associate Professoron leavehttp://primus.nss.udel.edu/CoursesSearch/search-results?first_instr_name=Rawat

 

 

Dalit StudiesRawat, RamnarayanK. SatyanarayanaDuke University Press2016https://www.dukeupress.edu/dalit-studies?viewby=author&lastname=Rawat&firstname=Ramnarayan%20S.&middlename=&sort=newest<p>​The contributors to this major intervention into Indian historiography trace the strategies through which Dalits have been marginalized as well as the ways Dalit intellectuals and leaders have shaped emancipatory politics in modern India. Moving beyond the anticolonialism/nationalism binary that dominates the study of India, the contributors assess the benefits of colonial modernity and place humiliation, dignity, and spatial exclusion at the center of Indian historiography. Several essays discuss the ways Dalits used the colonial courts and legislature to gain minority rights in the early twentieth century, while others highlight Dalit activism in social and religious spheres. The contributors also examine the struggle of contemporary middle-class Dalits to reconcile their caste and class, intercaste tensions among Sikhs, and the efforts by Dalit writers to challenge dominant constructions of secular and class-based citizenship while emphasizing the ongoing destructiveness of caste identity. In recovering the long history of Dalit struggles against caste violence, exclusion, and discrimination, <em>Dalit Studies</em> outlines a new agenda for the study of India, enabling a significant reconsideration of many of the Indian academy's core assumptions.</p>
Reconsidering Untouchability Chamars and Dalit History in North IndiaRawat, RamnarayanPermanent Black and Indiana University Press2012http://permanent-black.blogspot.com/2012/05/major-contribution-to-dalit-history.html<p> Often identified as leatherworkers or characterized as a criminal caste, the Chamars of North India have long been stigmatized as untouchables. In this pathbreaking study, Ramnarayan S. Rawat shows that in fact the majority of Chamars have always been agriculturalists, and their association with the ritually impure occupation of leatherworking has largely been constructed through Hindu, colonial, and postcolonial representations of untouchability. </p><p> </p><p> Rawat undertakes a comprehensive reconsideration of the history, identity, and politics of this important Dalit group. Using Dalit vernacular literature, local-level archival sources, and interviews in Dalit neighborhoods, he reveals a previously unrecognized Dalit movement which has flourished in North India from the earliest decades of the twentieth century and which has recently achieved major political successes. </p>
Reconsidering Untouchability Chamars and Dalit History in North IndiaRawat, RamnarayanPermanent Black and Indiana University Press2011http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/product_info.php?products_id=481808<p>Winner of the Joseph W. Elder Prize in the Indian Social Sciences, American Institute of Indian StudiesHonorable Mention, Association for Asian Studies, Bernard S. Cohn Prize</p><p>Often identified as leatherworkers or characterized as a criminal caste, Chamars of North India have long been stigmatized as untouchables. In this pathbreaking study, Ramnarayan S. Rawat shows that in fact the majority of Chamars have always been agriculturalists, and their association with the ritually impure occupation of leatherworking has largely been constructed through Hindu, colonial, and postcolonial representations of untouchability. Rawat undertakes a comprehensive reconsideration of the history, identity, and politics of this important Dalit group. Using Dalit vernacular literature, local-level archival sources, and interviews in Dalit neighborhoods, he reveals a previously unrecognized Dalit movement which has flourished in North India from the earliest decades of the 20th century and which has recently achieved major political successes.</p>

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  • Department of History
  • 46 W. Delaware Avenue
  • Newark, DE 19716, USA
  • University of Delaware
  • Phone: 302-831-2371
  • history@udel.edu